A blessing for the passing of the eclipse

end of eclipseThe soul in the darkness sins, but the real sinner is he who caused the darkness.  Victor Hugo, “Les Misérables”

It seems, at times, that Jewish traditions suggest blessing for anything. If one witnesses some natural beauty (for example, seeing a comet, lightning, an aurora borealis, or when seeing a mountain or ocean for the first time or after a long period) there is a blessing.   There are blessings for beautiful trees and animals, for seeing a rainbow and hearing thunder.

There is no blessing, however, for an eclipse (for more on that see here). Given how the rabbis in the Talmud understood an eclipse as a “bad omen” that should be no surprise.  Some rabbis are reluctant, even with modern understandings of an eclipse as a natural phenomenon, to suggest a new blessing since those before us felt differently. The current Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi in Israel suggests, instead, reciting Psalm 19 and 104 when seeing an eclipse.

I would like to offer an alternative  – to say blessing for the moment when the total solar eclipse ends. At that moment, when light first appears, we can balance the traditional understanding of the eclipse as a metaphor of moral darkness, but our power to bring a light of understanding, acceptance and love to create greater goodness in the world.

As soon as the eclipse passes, you may wish to say the traditional morning prayer for creation: “Praised are You, Eternal our God, Creator of light and darkness … Cause a new light to shine upon Zion.”  Or, you can also add this:

Witness to the darkness, allow me to be a maker of light. As the light of the sun reappears, may we be inspired to be among those who bring the light of wisdom, an openness of heart and soul.

 

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